Archives | Community and Regional Resilience Institute (CARRI)
 

Resilient Communities are the Foundations of a Resilient America.

Bureaucracy and Community Resilience

by John Plodinec

As you might imagine, I’ve had way too much experience with bureaucracies in my almost forty years working with the federal government.  In this post, let me look at bureaucracy through the lens of community resilience. …

Research Needed for the New Resilience

by John Plodinec

CARRI’s view of community resilience encompasses resistance, response and recovery.  As Claire Rubin and others have said, we simply don’t know enough about recovery and until we do, that lack of knowledge will hinder our attempts …

Resilience – Can’t We Try Something Different?

by John Plodinec

I just heard an interesting talk by Dr. Irwin Redlener of Columbia at the Hazards Conference here in Colorado. At the conclusion, he proposed that we needed more federal government coordination of resources for family and …

The New Resilience and Purpose-Driven Businesses

by John Plodinec

In several recent posts, I’ve written about a re-imagining of the American Dream for our new century. In this post, I begin a look at how we can achieve greater economic resilience. Recently I read Conscious …

Build It Better Leadership Forum

by Resilient Institute

Thursday and Friday I had the pleasure to attend the Build It Better Leadership Forum in Charlotte. Renaissance Reinsurance, the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes, and their partners put on a superlative event bringing together nearly …

The New Resilience

by Resilient Institute

Last month, I presented my view of where America is in terms of resilience (http://blog.resilientus.mediapulse.com/2013/01/20/america-the-less-resilient/). I argued that by too many measures, we are less resilient than we once were, and our trajectory is negative. However, …

We Know Who Owns the Problem – Who Owns the Solution?

by Resilient Institute

Excerpts from a December 29, 2012 article in the NY Times… “After Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc with power systems in the Northeast, many consumers and public officials complained that the electric utilities had done far too …

America, the Less Resilient

by Resilient Institute

I think we all have been heartened by the spirit displayed by our friends affected by Hurricane Sandy. Indeed, the press has almost continually praised their resilience. But “resilience” is not an absolute – it waxes …

Resilience and the “Founding Virtues”

by Resilient Institute

Charles Murray in Coming Apart writes about the importance of what he calls the “founding virtues.” His basic argument is that American society has been developed on a foundation of Industriousness. This virtue is based on …

Sandy Hook

by Resilient Institute

I have tried to avoid adding to the blather in the blogosphere about the terrible slaughter in Sandy Hook. But I have been incensed by the cynical pleading by single-interest groups promoting their own agendas; whether …

Crisis Coach Webinar Series

by Resilient Institute

The short-term recovery effort from Super-Storm Sandy is in full swing. However, for those affected by the storm, the toughest part of their efforts to come back – their long-term recovery and viability – still lies …

A Note from My Son

by Resilient Institute

I had an email from my son the other day that I thought I’d share with you. “Dad, We had a ‘fire emergency’ at work today and it got me thinking. I suspect it was a …

Thoughts on Sandy: III. “Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional” – Ernie Broussard, Cameron Parish, LA

by Resilient Institute

Over on the Recovery Diva site, Claire Rubin linked to another sorry tale of political failure in the face of Hurricane Sandy. Mayor Bloomberg in NYC failed to order the evacuation of over 40 nursing homes …

Thoughts on Sandy: II. Unprecedented?

by Resilient Institute

To me, one of the more disgusting aspects of Hurricane Sandy was the rush by some to call the storm “unprecedented,” and to blame it on global warming. Contributing to this is the media’s – and …

Thoughts on Sandy: I – Coming Back, To What?

by Resilient Institute

I’ve tried to keep a relatively low profile about Sandy – there’s still a lot of pain out there, and people don’t need us in the blogosphere adding to it.  But the power is almost all …

A Few Words About Partnerships

by Resilient Institute

It has almost become a truism that partnerships are one of the cornerstones of community resilience. In fact, the National Academies published a study almost two years ago that focused exclusively on public-private partnerships and resilience. …

Things That Make You Go Hmmm About Diversity and Resilience

by Resilient Institute

My sincere apologies to Grant Williams and his newsletter (Things That Make You Go Hmmm). In discussions about resilience, “diversity” is a word that gets thrown into the conversation – a lot. “A resilient community’s economy …

Another Riff on Leadership and Community Resilience

by Resilient Institute

How important are leaders to community resilience? If we look at historians before 1850 (think Thomas Carlyle, for example), leaders are to history what pathfinders were to the pioneers – pointing the way forward even in …

Community Resilience and Innovation

by Resilient Institute

I just finished an oldie but goodie, Tainter’s The Collapse of Complex Societies. His main thesis is that societies solve problems in ways that make them more complex. Initially, this complexity can have a high rate …

Is It Resilience, or Resilience To ___?

by Resilient Institute

The surprise answer is “Yes.” This may seem like a silly question and a really silly answer, but they’re not. Really. Let me try to prove it to you. Recently I published a post titled “Disasters …

Sustainability and Community Resilience: III. The Evolution of a Community

by Resilient Institute

In previous posts in this series, I’ve tried to look at the relationship between sustainability and resilience, first in terms of time, then looking at how perceived self-interest impacts both. In this post, I’m going to …

Is Risk Useful?

by Resilient Institute

There has been a recent push by the Risk Management community for a greater involvement of rigorous risk science in emergency management planning. While I certainly am all for more rigor in planning, I had to …

Not All Disasters are the Color of Doom

by Resilient Institute

Recently, I read an interesting piece by Howard Pierpont, entitled “Is your organization prepared for this?” In the following, I’m going to quote and comment on what he wrote (with his permission). “Not every disaster is …

Sustainability and Community Resilience: II. The Importance of Perceived Self-Interest

by Resilient Institute

In the last post, I talked about the importance of time in trying to understand the relationship between sustainability and community resilience. Another definition is useful in this discussion – community. We can define a community …

Sustainability and Community Resilience: I. The Importance of Time

by Resilient Institute

As I’ve mentioned in previous blogs, fear of the apocalypse seems to be driving some of what’s being done in the name of resilience. The Transition Town movement and John Robb’s Resilient Community blog are both …

Disasters Have Direction – What Does That Mean for Community Resilience?

by Resilient Institute

For a few years, FEMA and DHS have championed the idea of an “All Hazards – Maximum of Maxima” approach to planning. The basic premise is that if a community plans for the worst of the …

Three – and a Half – Things I Think I Think About Community Resilience

by Resilient Institute

No deep thoughts from me today; just three things touched lightly, and someone else’s deep thought – and since I strongly agree with it, I’ll take credit for half a thought. 1. Last week, the Energy …

Building Trust; Building Community Resilience

by Resilient Institute

Charles Murray (in Coming Apart) presents data showing the breakdown of trust, especially in lower class communities. He asks “whether the remaining levels of social trust [in lower class communities] are enough to sustain anything approaching …